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Jurmala, Latvia

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PURE project (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) improved the efficiency of phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plants of Belarus, Poland, Latvia and Estonia. The project was implemented with partial funding of the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its participants included several water utilities of the Baltic area as well as the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC). Through the project, the Foundation implemented technical surveys related to phosphorus removal and monitored the implementation of wastewater treatment plant investment. Moreover, the Foundation steered the subproject dedicated to sludge treatment. All PURE project investments were completed in September 2013, when the wastewater treatment plant of Brest deployed the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus. After the closure of the PURE project, the Foundation continues to cooperate with the Brest water utility in order to improve the management system of the phosphorus removal process. The PURE project resulted in a reduction of 300–500 tonnes in the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea.

Schedule:
2011 - 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500 (PURE all target cities)

Cost:
PURE was financed with partial funding from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its total budget was MEUR 3.2. The Foundation's budget in the project was 0,6 MEUR.

Funding:
EU 80%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 15%

Jurmala, Latvia

Jurmala
Jurmala

In 2011 – 2012, Jurmala invested in improving the efficiency of biological nutrient removal (PURE Project).

Kohtla-Järve, Viro

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PURE project (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) improved the efficiency of phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plants of Belarus, Poland, Latvia and Estonia. The project was implemented with partial funding of the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its participants included several water utilities of the Baltic area as well as the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC). Through the project, the Foundation implemented technical surveys related to phosphorus removal and monitored the implementation of wastewater treatment plant investment. Moreover, the Foundation steered the subproject dedicated to sludge treatment. All PURE project investments were completed in September 2013, when the wastewater treatment plant of Brest deployed the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus. After the closure of the PURE project, the Foundation continues to cooperate with the Brest water utility in order to improve the management system of the phosphorus removal process. The PURE project resulted in a reduction of 300–500 tonnes in the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea.

Schedule:
2011- 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500 (PURE all target cities)

Cost:
PURE was financed with partial funding from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its total budget was MEUR 3.2. The Foundation's budget in the project was 0,6 MEUR.

Funding:
EU 80%, YM 5%, JNS 15%

Kohtla-Järve

As part of the PURE project, wastewater treatment and sludge handling were improved at the Kohtla Lake wastewater treatment plant in 2010–2012. The plant was removed from HELCOM’s ‘hot spot’ list in 2012.

Gdansk ja Szczecin, Puola

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PURE project (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) improved the efficiency of phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plants of Belarus, Poland, Latvia and Estonia. The project was implemented with partial funding of the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its participants included several water utilities of the Baltic area as well as the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC). Through the project, the Foundation implemented technical surveys related to phosphorus removal and monitored the implementation of wastewater treatment plant investment. Moreover, the Foundation steered the subproject dedicated to sludge treatment. All PURE project investments were completed in September 2013, when the wastewater treatment plant of Brest deployed the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus. After the closure of the PURE project, the Foundation continues to cooperate with the Brest water utility in order to improve the management system of the phosphorus removal process. The PURE project resulted in a reduction of 300–500 tonnes in the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea.

Schedule:
2011- 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500 (PURE all target cities)

Cost:
PURE was financed with partial funding from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its total budget was MEUR 3.2. The Foundation's budget in the project was 0,6 MEUR.

Funding:
EU 80%, The Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 15%

Gdansk AND Szczecin, Poland

2012-12-04 09.06.37

Through the more efficient use of their treatment plants, PURE participants Szczecin and Gdansk reduced the phosphorus loads entering the Baltic Sea to the levels recommended by HELCOM. The Szczecin water utility was removed from HELCOM’s ‘hot spot’ list in 2012.

Gdansk ja Szczecin, Puola

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PURE project (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) improved the efficiency of phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plants of Belarus, Poland, Latvia and Estonia. The project was implemented with partial funding of the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its participants included several water utilities of the Baltic area as well as the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC). Through the project, the Foundation implemented technical surveys related to phosphorus removal and monitored the implementation of wastewater treatment plant investment. Moreover, the Foundation steered the subproject dedicated to sludge treatment. All PURE project investments were completed in September 2013, when the wastewater treatment plant of Brest deployed the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus. After the closure of the PURE project, the Foundation continues to cooperate with the Brest water utility in order to improve the management system of the phosphorus removal process. The PURE project resulted in a reduction of 300–500 tonnes in the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea.

Schedule:
2011- 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500 (PURE all target cities)

Cost:
PURE was financed with partial funding from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its total budget was MEUR 3.2. The Foundation's budget in the project was 0,6 MEUR.

Funding:
EU 80%, The Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 15%

Gdansk AND Szczecin, Poland

2012-12-04 09.06.37

Through the more efficient use of their treatment plants, PURE participants Szczecin and Gdansk reduced the phosphorus loads entering the Baltic Sea to the levels recommended by HELCOM. The Szczecin water utility was removed from HELCOM’s ‘hot spot’ list in 2012.

Baranovitshi, Lida, Polotsk ja Slonim, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
The cities with training focus have so far not invested in chemical phosphorus removal.

Cost:

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

BaranoviCHI, Lida, Polotsk and Slonim, BELARUSpic_ 048

Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Photo: John Nurminen Foundation and Lida water utility have started negotiations on investments at the Lida wastewater treatment plant. From the left, Yuri Bertzevitch, Director of Lida water utility, Inna Voiza, Head of Laboratory, Elena Mihnovez, engineer, Elena Kaskelainen and Marjukka Porvari from the Foundation, and Alexander Auhmenia representing Lida City administration. (Photo Tuula Putkinen)

 

Baranovitshi, Lida, Polotsk ja Slonim, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
The cities with training focus have so far not invested in chemical phosphorus removal.

Cost:

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

BaranoviCHI, Lida, Polotsk and Slonim, BELARUSpic_ 048

Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Photo: John Nurminen Foundation and Lida water utility have started negotiations on investments at the Lida wastewater treatment plant. From the left, Yuri Bertzevitch, Director of Lida water utility, Inna Voiza, Head of Laboratory, Elena Mihnovez, engineer, Elena Kaskelainen and Marjukka Porvari from the Foundation, and Alexander Auhmenia representing Lida City administration. (Photo Tuula Putkinen)

 

Baranovitshi, Lida, Polotsk ja Slonim, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
The cities with training focus have so far not invested in chemical phosphorus removal.

Cost:

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

BaranoviCHI, Lida, Polotsk and Slonim, BELARUSpic_ 048

Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Photo: John Nurminen Foundation and Lida water utility have started negotiations on investments at the Lida wastewater treatment plant. From the left, Yuri Bertzevitch, Director of Lida water utility, Inna Voiza, Head of Laboratory, Elena Mihnovez, engineer, Elena Kaskelainen and Marjukka Porvari from the Foundation, and Alexander Auhmenia representing Lida City administration. (Photo Tuula Putkinen)

 

Baranovitshi, Lida, Polotsk ja Slonim, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
The cities with training focus have so far not invested in chemical phosphorus removal.

Cost:

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

BaranoviCHI, Lida, Polotsk and Slonim, BELARUSpic_ 048

Baranovichi, Polotsk, Lida and Slonim participate in the PRESTO project by training their water utilities in more efficient wastewater treatment processes. In 2013, again with financing from the PRESTO project, technical plans for the improved efficiency of phosphorus removal in the Belarusian city of Lida were drawn up. Tendering documentation was completed in 2014. The objective is to implement investments in Lida through a continuation project financed either by the EU or some other stakeholder who supports wastewater treatment plant investments in Belarus.

Photo: John Nurminen Foundation and Lida water utility have started negotiations on investments at the Lida wastewater treatment plant. From the left, Yuri Bertzevitch, Director of Lida water utility, Inna Voiza, Head of Laboratory, Elena Mihnovez, engineer, Elena Kaskelainen and Marjukka Porvari from the Foundation, and Alexander Auhmenia representing Lida City administration. (Photo Tuula Putkinen)

 

Grodno, Molodetshno ja Vitebsk, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PRESTO project (Project on Reduction of Eutrophication of the Sea Today) invests in improving the efficiency of nutrient removal in the three Belarusian cities of Grodno, Vitebsk and Molodechno. In the summer of 2013 the water utilities signed agreements on equipment deliveries. Construction work and equipment installation at the treatment plants began in the autumn of 2013, and will be completed by September 2014. Preliminary evaluations indicate that the PRESTO investments will reduce the phosphorus load entering the waterways from these wastewater treatment plants by as much as 500 tonnes.
The PRESTO project is financed by the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme and steered by the Union of the Baltic Cities UBC. The Foundation is responsible for commissioning the project’s technical surveys and managing its wastewater treatment plant investments.
The total budget of the PRESTO project is €4.55 million, of which investment to wastewater treatment plants accounts for €2 million. EU’s Baltic Sea Region Programme funds the majority of the project, bearing 75–90% of the project partners’ project costs (depending on the country where the partner operates). Moreover, the Finnish Ministry of the Environment supports Finnish project partners with a sum that covers the majority of their own costs.


Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500

Cost:
4 550 000

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

Grodno, MolodeChno AND Vitebsk, BELARUS

Grodno putsari 003

PRESTO project participants include the cities of Grodno, Molodechno and Vitebsk, where wastewater treatment plants invest in improved nutrient removal. Moreover, in 2012 Pöyry Finland implemented technical implementation plans for improved nutrient removal. Also, investment agreements with the water utilities were signed.

In 2013 the water utilities drew up local investment plans, which are needed in order to obtain official investment permits. Also, the Foundation supported the water utilities in setting up EU-compliant tendering processes and in the signing of agreements for equipment deliveries and construction work. In the autumn of 2013, the first batch of equipment was delivered to the water utilities, which began construction and installation works. In 2014, the second batch of equipment will be delivered to the water utilities. At the same time, the utilities will continue the construction and installation works. The EU has granted the investments of this project a schedule extension until September 2014.

 

Photo from Grodno wastewater treatment plant (Elena Kaskelainen).

Grodno, Molodetshno ja Vitebsk, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PRESTO project (Project on Reduction of Eutrophication of the Sea Today) invests in improving the efficiency of nutrient removal in the three Belarusian cities of Grodno, Vitebsk and Molodechno. In the summer of 2013 the water utilities signed agreements on equipment deliveries. Construction work and equipment installation at the treatment plants began in the autumn of 2013, and will be completed by September 2014. Preliminary evaluations indicate that the PRESTO investments will reduce the phosphorus load entering the waterways from these wastewater treatment plants by as much as 500 tonnes.
The PRESTO project is financed by the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme and steered by the Union of the Baltic Cities UBC. The Foundation is responsible for commissioning the project’s technical surveys and managing its wastewater treatment plant investments.
The total budget of the PRESTO project is €4.55 million, of which investment to wastewater treatment plants accounts for €2 million. EU’s Baltic Sea Region Programme funds the majority of the project, bearing 75–90% of the project partners’ project costs (depending on the country where the partner operates). Moreover, the Finnish Ministry of the Environment supports Finnish project partners with a sum that covers the majority of their own costs.


Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500

Cost:
4 550 000

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

Grodno, MolodeChno AND Vitebsk, BELARUS

Grodno putsari 003

PRESTO project participants include the cities of Grodno, Molodechno and Vitebsk, where wastewater treatment plants invest in improved nutrient removal. Moreover, in 2012 Pöyry Finland implemented technical implementation plans for improved nutrient removal. Also, investment agreements with the water utilities were signed.

In 2013 the water utilities drew up local investment plans, which are needed in order to obtain official investment permits. Also, the Foundation supported the water utilities in setting up EU-compliant tendering processes and in the signing of agreements for equipment deliveries and construction work. In the autumn of 2013, the first batch of equipment was delivered to the water utilities, which began construction and installation works. In 2014, the second batch of equipment will be delivered to the water utilities. At the same time, the utilities will continue the construction and installation works. The EU has granted the investments of this project a schedule extension until September 2014.

 

Photo from Grodno wastewater treatment plant (Elena Kaskelainen).

Grodno, Molodetshno ja Vitebsk, Valko-Venäjä

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PRESTO project (Project on Reduction of Eutrophication of the Sea Today) invests in improving the efficiency of nutrient removal in the three Belarusian cities of Grodno, Vitebsk and Molodechno. In the summer of 2013 the water utilities signed agreements on equipment deliveries. Construction work and equipment installation at the treatment plants began in the autumn of 2013, and will be completed by September 2014. Preliminary evaluations indicate that the PRESTO investments will reduce the phosphorus load entering the waterways from these wastewater treatment plants by as much as 500 tonnes.
The PRESTO project is financed by the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme and steered by the Union of the Baltic Cities UBC. The Foundation is responsible for commissioning the project’s technical surveys and managing its wastewater treatment plant investments.
The total budget of the PRESTO project is €4.55 million, of which investment to wastewater treatment plants accounts for €2 million. EU’s Baltic Sea Region Programme funds the majority of the project, bearing 75–90% of the project partners’ project costs (depending on the country where the partner operates). Moreover, the Finnish Ministry of the Environment supports Finnish project partners with a sum that covers the majority of their own costs.


Schedule:
2011 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500

Cost:
4 550 000

Funding:
EU 90%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 5%

Grodno, MolodeChno AND Vitebsk, BELARUS

Grodno putsari 003

PRESTO project participants include the cities of Grodno, Molodechno and Vitebsk, where wastewater treatment plants invest in improved nutrient removal. Moreover, in 2012 Pöyry Finland implemented technical implementation plans for improved nutrient removal. Also, investment agreements with the water utilities were signed.

In 2013 the water utilities drew up local investment plans, which are needed in order to obtain official investment permits. Also, the Foundation supported the water utilities in setting up EU-compliant tendering processes and in the signing of agreements for equipment deliveries and construction work. In the autumn of 2013, the first batch of equipment was delivered to the water utilities, which began construction and installation works. In 2014, the second batch of equipment will be delivered to the water utilities. At the same time, the utilities will continue the construction and installation works. The EU has granted the investments of this project a schedule extension until September 2014.

 

Photo from Grodno wastewater treatment plant (Elena Kaskelainen).

Brest

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
The PURE project (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) improved the efficiency of phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plants of Belarus, Poland, Latvia and Estonia. The project was implemented with partial funding of the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its participants included several water utilities of the Baltic area as well as the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC). Through the project, the Foundation implemented technical surveys related to phosphorus removal and monitored the implementation of wastewater treatment plant investment. Moreover, the Foundation steered the subproject dedicated to sludge treatment. All PURE project investments were completed in September 2013, when the wastewater treatment plant of Brest deployed the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus. After the closure of the PURE project, the Foundation continues to cooperate with the Brest water utility in order to improve the management system of the phosphorus removal process. The PURE project resulted in a reduction of 300–500 tonnes in the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea.

Schedule:
2011- 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500 (PURE all target cities)

Cost:
PURE was financed with partial funding from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme, and its total budget was MEUR 3.2. The Foundation's budget in the project was 0,6 MEUR.

Funding:
EU 80%, Ministry of the Environment 5%, JNF 15%

Brest

pic_ 118

In 2012, the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme extended the schedule of the city of Brest so that investments could be carried out by the end of June 2013, and in 2013 the schedule was further extended until September 2013. Investments in Brest were completed in September 2013, when, after a final inspection, the first chemical phosphorus removal system in Belarus was deployed.

In 2014, the Foundation also invested in analyzers and related software that measure the consumption and demand for precipitation chemicals at the Brest wastewater treatment plant.

 

Riika, Latvia

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Within the scope of PURE project, Riga water utility has invested in chemical phosphorus removal, improved sludge handling and more accurate analytics on incoming waste waters. In addition to the PURE project, the Foundation had a separate agreement on improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal, signed with the Riga water utility in 2009. These investments were carried out in 2012, when the Foundation signed a financing agreement with the Riga water utility. In the summer of 2012, another precipitation tank was acquired for Riga via an open bidding competition and delivered on-site in late 2012. The final installation work for the tank, delivered by the Foundation, was carried out in 2013.

Schedule:
2009 - 2013

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
100 - 200

Cost:
410,000 euros (excluding construction costs funded by Riga water utility)

Funding:
Riga water utility, PURE project (EU), Ålandsbanken, JNF

Riga, LATVIA

LR_RigaWWTP_DSC04672_ISO

Within the scope of PURE project, Riga water utility has invested in chemical phosphorus removal, improved sludge handling and more accurate analytics on incoming waste waters. In addition to the PURE project, the Foundation had a separate agreement on improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal, signed with the Riga water utility in 2009. These investments were carried out in 2012, when the Foundation signed a financing agreement with the Riga water utility. In the summer of 2012, another precipitation tank was acquired for Riga via an open bidding competition and delivered on-site in late 2012. The final installation work for the tank, delivered by the Foundation, was carried out in 2013.

 

Varsova

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Improved nutrient removal in the city wastewater treatment plants.

Schedule:
2008 - 2012

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
500

Cost:

Funding:
Warsaw water utility, EU

WARSAW

IMG_8395 Varsovan

Up to five years ago the city of Warsaw was a great polluter of the Baltic Sea, as the majority of its wastewaters were allowed to enter the River Vistula completely untreated. The Foundation contacted the city authorities in 2007, and in 2008 a memorandum of understanding on improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal at the city’s wastewater treatment plants was signed. In 2008, the Foundation commissioned a technical survey which was taken into account in the rebuilding plans of the city’s most important wastewater treatment plant, the Czajka (Northern Lapwing). The rebuilding of the Czajka was completed in 2012, and nutrient removal at the treatment plant is in line with all HELCOM recommendations and has been able to reduce its phosphorus load by more than 60%. The capital of Poland, which joined EU In 2004, has invested billions of euros in modern water treatment infrastructure during the past seven years. So far, the Czajka plant has cost approximately 800 million euros, of which one third was financed by the EU. The investments in the Warsaw area have in fact been the most significant environmental investments in Europe in recent years. As has been done in Viikinmäki, Helsinki, the city of Warsaw also utilises the energy that can be harvested from wastewater sludge. According to Leszek Drogosz, director of infrastructure of the City of Warsaw, recycling at Czajka truly works: for example, 30% of the energy needed annually by street lighting in Warsaw can be obtained by using biogas generated through digestion. Annually, this corresponds to 140 train cars of coal.

Fosforit-lannoitetehdas, Kingisepp

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Preventing phosphorus discharges from the phosphogypsum waste stack in the area of Phosphorit fertilizer factory in Kingisepp, Russia

Schedule:
2012 - 2014

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
1700 - 2000

Cost:

Funding:
EuroChem

PHOSPHORIT FERTILIZER FACTORY, Kingisepp, RUSSIA

joukko kipsikasan juurella

In early 2012, an annual phosphorus load of approximately 1,700 tonnes, originating at the Phosphorit fertilizer factory owned by EuroChem, was discovered in the River Luga. The Foundation offered the company assistance in removing the source of the load, and provided the company access to the best Finnish expertise on managing loads from phosphorus production to waterways. In March 2012, the Phosphorit experts built a runoff water treatment system at the factory site. In June 2012, the Foundation and EuroChem agreed to jointly hire an independent European expert organisation to assess the effectiveness of the Phosphorit runoff water treatment system. The tasks of the expert organisation were prepared in cooperation with EuroChem in the winter of 2013. In the summer of 2013, the British consultancy Atkins was selected as the independent expert, and their assessment work began in the autumn of 2013. The first samples from the River Luga were collected in October 2013, and the results were published in early 2014. The work will continue until the autumn of 2014.

 

 

Udarnik poultry farm in village of Pobeda

Project Summary

State:
On-going

Scope:

Schedule:
2011 - 2015

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
20

Cost:
430,000 euros

Funding:
Udarnik, NIB (BSAP Trust Fund), JNF

Udarnik Poultry farm in village of pobeda

694

In 2011, in addition to the wastewater treatment plant projects, the Foundation began charting out possibilities to start a project that aims at reducing loads from the animal farms of the Leningrad region. Four large poultry farms were selected as targets, and discussions continued with the Udarnik poultry farm. A joint project was initiated in 2012 with the objective of reducing the nutrient runoff entering waterways and the Baltic Sea from the manure pools of the poultry farm.

An investigation into improving manure treatment methods was initiated in June 2012. In the autumn of 2012, Udarnik built new manure treatment pools in the area, and began the planning of two new manure pools. In addition to the support from the John Nurminen Foundation, the Udarnik poultry farm project received additional funding in the spring of 2012 from the Baltic Sea Action Plan Trust Fund, established by the states of Sweden and Finland. During 2013, the Foundation and the owners of the Udarnik poultry farm joined forces to investigate the options of minimising the risk of leakages to the environment from the old and new manure pools. In 2014, the farm will be equipped with a filtering system that can be used to treat the runoff waters from the manure pools, thus preventing nutrient discharges to the nearby waterways.

 

 

Viipuri

Project Summary

State:
On-going

Scope:
Improving phosphorus removal efficiency at Vyborg wastewater treatment plant

Schedule:
2010 - 2015

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
20

Cost:
EUR 817 000

Funding:
Vyborg Water Utility, JNF

VYBORG

Säiliö 4 (2)

 

With the inauguration of the chemical phosphorus removal equipment delivered to the Vyborg water utility by the John Nurminen Foundation in the autumn of 2016, the wastewaters of the city of Vyborg will be treated efficiently. The plant will now deploy advanced nutrient removal, after which the phosphorus concentrations in wastewaters leaving the water utility are reduced to the level recommended by the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission HELCOM (0.5 mg of phosphorus per leaving litre of wastewater).

Vyborg has approximately 80,000 inhabitants. The city’s wastewaters end up directly in the Finnish coastal areas via the Bay of Vyborg. Advanced nutrient removal will reduce the annual phosphorus load of the Gulf of Finland, which ends in the Bay of Vyborg, by approximately 20 tonnes. This is almost as much as the annual discharges from the wastewater treatment plant in Viikinmäki, Helsinki.

The delivery, installation and construction works of the plant’s phosphorus removal system were completed in July-October 2016. In this joint project of the Vyborg Water Utility and the John Nurminen Foundation, the Foundation has been responsible for procuring the phosphorus removal equipment, while the water utility has taken care of the costs of installation and construction. The second phase of the project, implemented in 2017, will introduce advanced biological treatment, which supports phosphorus removal and improves the removal of nitrogen. The total cost of the Foundation’s subproject is approximately €140,000.

Joint project launched in 2010

In June 2010, a memorandum of understanding was signed with the Vyborg Water Utility on improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal, and agreeing on the implementation of phosphorus removal tests at the treatment plant. In the winter of 2010 – 2011, the tests were implemented with equipment delivered by the Foundation and financing from the Finnish Ministry of the Environment. Based on test results, a technical process plan was drawn up in 2011, together with tendering documentation for improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal at the Vyborg plant.

An investment agreement with the Vyborg Water Utility was signed in spring 2012. The implementation of the agreement has, however, been delayed due to the constant changes in management at the Vyborg Water Utility, and a breakage in the treatment plant’s main sewer pipe. In July 2014, Vyborg celebrated the completion of a new header pipe. The Foundation’s project could now move ahead in cooperation with the plant’s new management, but delays in tax and customs exemption decisions meant that equipment deliveries could not begin before 2016.

In addition to the project in Vyborg, the Foundation has three ongoing projects in Russia: projects for the treatment of municipal wastewaters in Gatchina and Kingisepp, and the Udarnik poultry farm project in the village of Pobeda.

 

 

 

Gatchina

Project Summary

State:
On-going

Scope:
Improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal at the Gatchina wastewater treatment plant.

Schedule:
2010 - 2015

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
40

Cost:
500,000 euros

Funding:
Gatchina WWTP, JNF

Gatchina

Vasemmalla Jaroslav Kononov ja oikealla Grigori Osmanov Hatsinan vesilaitokselta. Keskellä John Nurmisen Säätiön projektipäällikkö Elena Kaskelainen.

The chemical phosphorus removal equipment, delivered to the Gatchina water utility in 2015 by the John Nurminen Foundation, was inaugurated in November 2015 at the Gatchina wastewater treatment plant, where phosphorus will now be removed from wastewaters with greater efficiency. After more efficient nutrient removal, the phosphorus level of the wastewater leaving the water utility will be reduced to the level recommended by the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission Helcom (0.5 mg P/l).

(From left: Jaroslav Kononov, Gatchina water utlity, Elena Kaskelainen, John Nurminen Foundation and Grigori Osmanov, Gatchina water utility. Photo taken on November 5, 2015). 

The installation and construction of the treatment plant’s phosphorus removal system has taken place this year. In this joint project of the Gatchina water utility and the John Nurminen Foundation, the Foundation has been responsible for phosphorus removal equipment procurement while the water utility has taken care of the costs of installation, local planning and construction.

A chemical container, worth approximately €100,000 and used in chemical phosphorus removal, was funded by the Foundation’s Horizon campaign, launched in 2013. Through the campaign, private individuals have been able to make a donation to the Horizon artwork, located on the Jätkäsaari pier.

The second part of the project will be carried out in 2017: in this phase, the treatment plant will be supplied with biological removal equipment which supports phosphorus removal and enables more efficient nitrogen removal.

In addition to the water utility and the Foundation, the project’s partners and financiers include NEFCO (Nordic Environment Finance Corporation), SIDA (Swedish International Development Agency) and NDEP (Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership, all of whom participate in the implementation of biological nutrient removal.

Through the Gatchina project, the annual phosphorus load of the Gulf of Finland will be reduced by 25 to 30 tonnes. This amount corresponds to the annual phosphorus loads originating in the wastewater treatment plant of Viikinmäki, Helsinki. The total costs of the Foundation’s subproject amount to approximately €500,000.

‘Since Gatchina is the second largest city of the Leningrad region after St. Petersburg, removing phosphorus from wastewaters in this city is a logical continuation to the cleaning effort of the Gulf of Finland, launched by the Foundation in St. Petersburg. Phosphorus removal in Gatchina is therefore the most efficient way to reduce the nutrient load of the Gulf of Finland, leading also to a reduction in the algae blooms of this marine area’, says Marjukka Porvari, director of the Foundation’s Clean Sea projects.

Gatchina, located southwest of St. Petersburg, has approximately 80,000 inhabitants. The wastewaters of the city are directed to the river Izhora, which flows via the Neva to the Gulf of Finland.

Cooperation between the Foundation and the Gatchina water utility was launched in 2009. In February 2010, a letter of intent was signed on improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal at the city treatment plant.   In 2011, the Foundation financed a technical plan and tendering documentation for the deployment of phosphorus removal at the Gatchina plant. The Board of Directors of the Foundation approved the financing of the project in 2012. In 2013, a financing agreement for the implementation of the project was signed with the Gatchina water utility.

 

 

 

Pietarin jätevedenpuhdistamo

Project Summary

State:
Completed

Scope:
Chemical phoshorus removal to the three largest wastewater treatment plants of St. Petersburg

Schedule:
2005-2011

Environmental impact:
(Annual phosphorus reduction in tonnes)
1000

Cost:
5 000 000 €

Funding:
Vodokanal of St. Petersburg 50%, JNF 34 %, Ministry of the Environment 16%

St. Petersburg great wastewater treatment plants: northern, central and southwestern

pietarilounainenmiinamaki.resized

The prerequisites for the Foundation’s operations in St. Petersburg were created by international financiers who have been active in the region for quite some time. For example, the Ministry of the Environment established its co-operation with the St. Petersburg water utility already in 1991. The Ministry of the Environment has been involved in various projects, including, for example, the improvement of the sewerage system and basic infrastructure of wastewater treatment; improved efficiency of plant use; phosphorus removal tests; and the development of the water utility’s administration. Once the majority of St. Petersburg’s wastewaters had been directed to wastewater treatment plants, it became possible for the Foundation to start planning the construction of a permanent phosphorus removal system, and committing the utility to the continuous use of coagulation chemicals.

The Foundation’s co-operation with the St. Petersburg water utility began in 2005, when an agreement was signed on the improvement of phosphorus removal efficiency at the larger i.e. central, southwestern and northern water treatment plants of St. Petersburg. The Foundation was in charge of the technical planning of investments, the co-ordination of Finnish and Russian planning work, purchasing management, and the procurement and delivery of equipment at the plants. The Finnish Ministry of the Environment participated in the financing of the projects at the central and southwestern wastewater treatment plants. The project at the northern wastewater treatment plant is partially financed by the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency, SIDA. The estimated total cost of the larger St. Petersburg plant projects borne by the Foundation is 2.5 million euros.

Improving the efficiency of phosphorus removal at St. Petersburg’s central wastewater treatment plant was completed in 2009, and in 2010, the project focused on the phosphorus removal implementation of the southwestern and northern plants. The last required pieces of equipment were delivered to the southwestern plant in May of 2010, and installed by the St. Petersburg water utility. Work at the Northern wastewater treatment plant was completed in summer 2011.

Once the project was complete, the annual phosphorus load to the Baltic Sea was reduced by more than 1,000 tonnes. The Foundation’s co-operation with the Vodokanal of St. Petersburg continues and new joint projects are being planned.

Click the markers on the map to read more.

The Foundation’s Clean Baltic Sea projects work to stop the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea by reducing the nutrient load that ends up in the Baltic Sea as efficiently as possible. The Foundation’s goal is to significantly and concretely progress the target set by the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission (HELCOM),
i.e. for the Baltic Sea to reach a good ecological status by the year 2021. In 2005 – 2016, the Foundation has completed 14 projects that have reduced the annual phosphorus load of the Baltic Sea of the more than 2,000 tonnes.

Click the project on the map for more information (see the list of all projects below):

Completed projects on the map:
Wastewater treatment plants in St. Petersburg and Phosphorit Fertilizer factory in Kingisepp, Russia
Kohtla-Järve, Estonia
Latvia: Jurmala and Riga
Poland: Gdansk, Szczecin and Warsaw
Belarus: Brest, Grodno, Molodechno, Vitebsk, Baranovichi, Lida and Slonim

Ongoing project in the map (in Russia):
Gatchina, Vyborg, Udarnik and Kingisepp